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Search // head
Results 1-9 of 9 for ' head ' (0 seconds)
Director: Frederic Vicaire Voglimacci | Synopsis: Mankind has abused of its power. What if the only part of humanity left was hosted in a scrap head, sheltered in a cathedral ?| First broadcast the 04-01-2005
CHANNELS // Animation 
Added: 3505 days ago by reservoirfilms
Runtime: 235.96 | Views: 10043 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
Director: Sergiu Lupse | Synopsis:A man finds himself inexorably drawn by the TV screen. A force is compelling him to get closer and interact with the screen. He manages to get inside the TV set and to his misfortune meets the one who was calling him.
Array // tv  evil  remote  white  death  pyramid  head  Reservoir  Films 
Added: 3273 days ago by keinezung
Runtime: 154.32 | Views: 35324 | Comments: 0
     
Réalisé par: RAMON AND PEDRO (Antoine Tinguely et Laurent Fauchère)
Produit par: Xavier Derigo et Isabelle Pasini

Louis I: Zacharie Destraz
LouisII: Jules Martinet
Louis III: Pierrick Destraz
Louis IV: Henri Destraz (dit Henri Dès)
Bébé: Zoé Tinguely
Fille sous la douche: Patricia Rodrigues

Doublures: Danaé Destraz
Cédric Dayen
Eddy Kupper
Pierrick Destraz
Hans Meier

Coach enfant: Sylvia Fardel
Chef Opérateur: Hans Meier
1er assistant caméra: Fabrizio Dorig
2ème assistant caméra: Hugo Veludo
1ère assistante de réalisation: Sonia Rossier
2ème assistante de réalisation: Antonin Schopfer
Scripte: Marie Chaduc
Assistante scripte: Aurélie Aeberhard
Régisseur général: Christophe Chiesa
Régisseur plateau: Adrienne Bovet
Assistant régie: Quentin Bocksberger
Maquillage: Leticia Rochaux-Ortis
Coiffure, implants: Véronique Jaggi, Emanuelle Olivet Pellegrin
Prothésiste dentaire: Stéphane Villeneuve
Chef Déco: Nicolas Imhof
Accessoiriste: Marie-Jo Saxod
Constructeur: Pascal Baillods
Peintre: Benoît Fontaine
Chef électricien: Samy Emery (Luxan SA)
Machiniste: Alberico Dos Santos (Luxan SA)
Photographes de plateau: Simon Wannaz, Guillaume Mégroz, Montage: Water NYC
Effets spéciaux: Moka Studio et Water NYC
Superviseur effets spéciaux: Nicolas Elsig
Compositing: Simon Wannaz, Yoann ponti, Arnaud Savoy
Colorimétrie: Buxum Studio
Coloriste: Eun Song
Coordinateur: Chan Wong Park
Sound Design: Capitaine Plouf
Producteur: Frédérique Doll
Bruiteur: Alexandre Le Mouroux
Sound Design/Mixage: Gabriel Guérin
Supervision Musicale: Bryan Ray Trucotte
Musique composée par: Topper Headon; Mick Jones; Joe Strummer
Interprétée par: The Clash
Courtesy: Epic Records and Sony Music Entertainment (UK) LTD by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing

Remerciements: Toute la famille Destraz
Georges Berman
Serge Musy
Jean Blaise Perrin
Serge Nidegger
Patrick Magnin
Daniel Balmat
Matthias Urban et sa montre
Anne-Rose Schwaab et Chucky
Tali Hyman
Francesco Solari
François Musy
Gabriel Hafner
Array // miroir  brosse  a  dent  radio  douche  diffusion  reservoir  films 
CHANNELS // Fantastic 
Added: 1177 days ago by ramon&pedro
Runtime: 0.00 | Views: 22669 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
Synopsis This is the tale of Left-brained Larry & Right-brained Rachel, a Siamese twin couple, stuck together by the head and thus resulting in them sharing only one brain. Using exactly fifty percent each, their separate personalities are kept intact and following the theory, being either left- or rightbrained, Larry and Rachel are complete opposites. They have a hard time being stuck together with their counterpart, but not only do they hate each other, their abnormality also makes them dislikable to the people around them, leaving them with a melancholy life of bullying and parental neglect. One thing the couple shares though is a common hatred and a longing for revenge. The opportunity arrives when they find out that using the whole brain at once might give them supernatural powers that can help rid them of their enemies. But the tragic lesson is learned: Being so opposite their team work is doomed to go terribly wrong.
CHANNELS // Animation  Fantastic 
Added: 1330 days ago by reservoirfilms
Runtime: 520.00 | Views: 23074 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
Synopsis: A woman regularly runs through a wooded area where bizarre things start to happen. She encounters a few unusual sights just as personal elements of her life are coming to a head and her communication to the outside world via cell phone is cut off.
Synopsis (fr): Une femme fait son jogging dans les bois tandis que des choses bizarres se produisent.
CHANNELS // Drama 
Added: 666 days ago by John_Panton
Runtime: 468.00 | Views: 5566 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
A 3D animated short film by ak3d.de Selfillumination a 3d animated short film in stereo 3d
This is a 3d animated shortfilm of my character "Selfillumination". It tells a short story on how you sometimes have to “change your head” to become really independent.
Array // self  3D  animated  short  film  broadcasting  reservoir  films 
CHANNELS // Animation 
Added: 1045 days ago by ak3d
Runtime: 330.00 | Views: 12956 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock | Produced by David O. Selznick | Screenplay by Angus MacPhail, Ben Hecht | Story by Hilary Saint George Saunder, John Palmer | Starring: Ingrid Bergman, Gregory Peck, Michael Chekhov, Leo G. Carroll, Rhonda Fleming | Music by Miklós Rózsa | Synopsis: Spellbound is a psychological mystery thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock in 1945. It tells the story of the new head of a mental asylum who turns out not to be what he claims. The film stars Ingrid Bergman, Gregory Peck, Michael Chekhov and Leo G. Carroll. It is an adaptation by Angus MacPhail and Ben Hecht of the novel The House of Dr. Edwardes (1927) by Hilary Saint George Saunders and John Palmer (writing as "Francis Beeding").
Array // spellbound  bergman  peck  hitchcock 
CHANNELS // Trailers  Classics 
Added: 2124 days ago by reservoirfilms
Runtime: 123.00 | Views: 19848 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
The Vision:
Back in October of 2009, I set out to make a film that would push my talents as both a storyteller and a filmmaker. I wanted to create a film that would challenge myself and my audience, meshing both classical and experimental storytelling techniques from music, books, & films that have inspired me in one way or another. I wanted to make a film that didn’t do any spoon-feeding, where my audience would leave with questions as well as answers. It was a long a difficult road to get to this point and there were days where I felt that I was in way over my head but eight months later, I can proudly say I’ve finally completed my film “The Bridge” and it was an experience I would never forget.

The Inspiration:
The story of The Bridge was a story a cousin had told me when I was eight years old. It was a ghost story about two siblings on a bridge. I remember it haunting me for weeks and causing many sleepless nights under my sheets. Obviously, it had a lasting influence in my life. It had always been one of those stories that I wanted to adapt into a short film so when the opportunity finally came one day, I decided to pull to trigger.
When I was in film school, I would constantly fantasize about making some sort of epic period piece, especially one that took place during WW2. So when I decided I was going to make The Bridge, I instantly followed it up with “hell, why not make it into a WW2 movie”? I could have easily made this film as a contemporary piece but where would the fun be in that? I never do things because it’s easy; I do it because it’s hard. I love a challenge. I figured I could keep the same characters, themes, motifs, style, and wrap it around a WW2 setting. So I did.

Pre-production:
So it began. After a quick outline, I started writing the screenplay and, being a one-man crew at the time, I also started doing work on costumes and props. I lived and breathed WW2 24/7. I watched every WW2 movie and documentary I could get my hands on. I even got my hands some real WW2 letters to get a grasp on the era’s language. I felt like a student again and I loved it. I scoured eBay for every WW2 field gear I could afford to buy and the stuff I couldn’t get, I had them custom made cheaply in China. I wanted it to be detailed and authentic as possible while keeping my almost non-existing budget down. I remember coming home one day and having almost a couple dozen eBay packages on front door. It looked like the front door of the post office.

Casting:
The casting of The Bridge was actually one of the smoothest aspects of the entire process. I first went to my good friend Amy and asked her if she would like to help me produce the film. Having worked with each other before, I didn’t really have to ask twice. She was happy to be my first recruit.
For the leading role, I asked my good friend Pablo Soriano to take the part. Having worked with him before, we have a good understanding of each other. He is just a naturally gifted actor and he makes my job as a director so much easier. Plus, his puppy dog eyes make him a perfect protagonist.
For the leading female role, I went looking for a girl who had beautiful, almost hypnotic eyes. That’s when I spotted Leah in one my good friend’s music video. I called up Carlos and basically told him, “I need to have that girl for movie”. A few days later, she was on board.
I owe the discovery of Mike, the character who plays James Connolly, to my producer Amy. She had read the script and recommended him. I remember her telling me “Mike IS James”. Words that any director would love to hear and as usual, Amy was right. So a couple months later, the script was complete, the costumes and props were ready, and the cast was cast. We were ready to shoot!

Production:
With our extremely limited budget, I knew right from day one that we were going to shoot “The Bridge” on DSLRs, specifically the Canon 7D and 5D Mark II. With this in mind, I knew (as also the DP of the film), I was going to push these cameras to its limits. I wasn’t going to let my equipment limit my vision of the film. I knew at the very beginning that I may or may not have a crappy movie in the end but hell, it’s gonna look damn good! We all know about the camera’s limitations but I wasn’t going to bitch and moan about it, I was going to work around it. I took it as a personal challenge to make these cameras work and I did. About 75% of the film was shot with the 7D and the rest with the 5DM2. The main reason I shot with the 7D more was the 24p firmware update wasn’t available for the 5DM2 during the bulk of the shooting. I prefer the 5DM2’s full frame sensor the 7D cropped sensor. Production, like any other shoot, had its ups and downs. Ours was mainly San Francisco’s unpredictable weather. You can blink and the bay area can go from miserable foggy weather (which is what I wanted for the film) to perfect summer beach party weather.
Also, being a guerilla production also has its own set of problems. I remember an actor and I almost getting arrested at a national park because a tourist reported seeing “some soldier carrying a rifle”. We got patted down and escorted off the premises. Before the ranger let us go, she handed me a business card for film permits. I thought that was hilarious.

Post-production:
There wasn’t really a “post-production” for The Bridge. I did post simultaneously during production. I would shoot on a weekend and then do visual effects or picture and sound editing on the weekdays. It was a very indie film workflow. The upside was I always had very polished dailies to show my cast and that kept them motivated to give me their best.
I spent my first two years out of film school as a CG artist. Being able to do my own 3d animation, modeling, surfacing, lighting, and rendering definitely upped the production value of my film. CG artists aren’t cheap and I calculated that if I had paid someone else to do my visual effects, it would have been double the entire budget of the film.
I hate ADR and foleying but if you don’t have a budget, you have to do it yourself. We had two whole scenes where sound was completely unusable (the tunnel scenes) so we had to redo it from scratch. I remember ADR sessions inside automobiles and 2 A.M. foley when my neighborhood is quiet and I don’t have to deal with traffic and barking dogs.
I discovered my composer Justin browsing through some filmmaking forums. He is such a talented musician. He added so much emotion to my film. Being a super control-freak, it’s very difficult for me to hand off any aspect of my film to someone else unless I have 100 percent confidence in that person. Justin is one of those people. In fact, Justin was the only other person who had a hand in post aside from me.
It was tough being a “one man studio” for this film. I acted as DP and director on Sunday, editor on Monday, sound editor on Tuesday, visual effects artist on Wednesday and Thursday, and compositor on Friday. I got some rest on Saturday (while my two computer farm renders). But in the end, when it all comes together… nothing feels more rewarding than seeing the art you’ve created. I can safely say that I created something I’m very proud of.

Full Circle:
So here it is. 8 months work compressed into a 30-minute narrative short. The film I set out to create back in October of 2009. I would like to thank everyone who was a part of it. I couldn’t have done it without you. To my viewers, I hope this film challenges you like it challenged me. Enjoy.
Array // bridge  war 
CHANNELS // Drama 
Added: 1323 days ago by reservoirfilms
Runtime: 1800.00 | Views: 4605 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
This is a not-at-all official music video for Heads Will Role by the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. It's a re-edit of my short film "The Dance of Death" co-produced with the National Film Board of Canada. You can check out the original short here. https://vimeo.com/12882206
Array // The  Dance  of  Death  Heads  Will  Role  by  the  Yeah  Yeah  Yeahs  Julian  van  Mil  broadcasting  reservoir  films 
CHANNELS // Clips 
Added: 766 days ago by julian_van_mil
Runtime: 221.00 | Views: 12797 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated

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