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Search // Ghost
Results 1-8 of 8 for ' Ghost ' (0 seconds)
Synopsis: A fortune teller tries to work his magic in order to get up close & personal with Betty. He shows her the days of her youth in his crystal ball as well as her being stranded on a deserted island. Then he shows himself rescuing her from the island, but also inadvertently releases an unsavory group of ghosts who chase the pair through a jungle that also magically appeared. The pair loses the ghosts using the hollow-log-over-the-cliff trick.
Array // Betty  Boop  jungle  island  ghosts  fortune  teller 
CHANNELS // Betty Boop  Classics 
Added: 2896 days ago by reservoirfilms
Runtime: 394.83 | Views: 25916 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
One might be tempted to polish the thing, arrangements and background music by Miss Parker are no less tense. And even if guitars blow a melody, the voice is dark and the bass is melancholic.
Almost Like if Manchester's sky was fallen on Marseille insidiously.
CHANNELS // Clips 
Added: 472 days ago by Esse
Runtime: 291.00 | Views: 4378 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
Betty Boop and Bimbo run away from home, but that night they are scared by a chorus of ghosts singing the title song.
Array // ghosts  song  betty  boop 
CHANNELS // Betty Boop  Classics 
Added: 3502 days ago by reservoirfilms
Runtime: 466.42 | Views: 23985 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
Réalisateur: Greg Tosolini Equipe_Technique: Produit par Anima Films Production et Ludovic Roussaux Acteurs: Jean-Michel Paquet, Sandrine Pottier | Directeur de la phodographie Ivan Ghez-Enjoubert Operateur Ludovic Roussaux | Assistante operateur Jennifer Joanides Chef electricien Quentin Gremaux Chef Machiniste Thomas Bouchet | Directeur Artistique Sebastien Antoine | Chef décorateur Thomas Bouchet Décorateur Julien Tosolini | Chef Maquilleur/SFX Gaston Altmeish Maquilleurs Laureen Armengau Aurélie Prodhomme Karl Bouveret 1er Assistant réalisateur Aude Gorski 2nd Assistant réalisateur Jérémie Laurent Montage Greg Tosolini Sebastien Antoine | Étalonnage Ludovic Roussaux Assistants de production Julien Tosolini Jérémie Laurent Régie Josiane Tosolini Jean-Jean Tosolini Musique et copyrights 20 Ghosts III Nine Inch Nails | Synopsis: WormEater is a music video created for the Nine Inch Nails Ghosts Film Festival.It is based on the track "20_Ghosts_III". The track "19_Ghosts_III" is used as an introduction. It was shot in 3 days during august 2008. The set was build in 3 weeks between july and august. | Format_de_prises_de_vues: HDV | Procédé: Couleur | Année: 2008 | Durée: 5,56 Min |
Array // WormEater  Nine  Inch  Nails  Ghosts  Film  Festival 
CHANNELS // Horror  Clips  Gore 
Added: 3006 days ago by Greg.T
Runtime: 356.00 | Views: 27334 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
The Vision:
Back in October of 2009, I set out to make a film that would push my talents as both a storyteller and a filmmaker. I wanted to create a film that would challenge myself and my audience, meshing both classical and experimental storytelling techniques from music, books, & films that have inspired me in one way or another. I wanted to make a film that didn’t do any spoon-feeding, where my audience would leave with questions as well as answers. It was a long a difficult road to get to this point and there were days where I felt that I was in way over my head but eight months later, I can proudly say I’ve finally completed my film “The Bridge” and it was an experience I would never forget.

The Inspiration:
The story of The Bridge was a story a cousin had told me when I was eight years old. It was a ghost story about two siblings on a bridge. I remember it haunting me for weeks and causing many sleepless nights under my sheets. Obviously, it had a lasting influence in my life. It had always been one of those stories that I wanted to adapt into a short film so when the opportunity finally came one day, I decided to pull to trigger.
When I was in film school, I would constantly fantasize about making some sort of epic period piece, especially one that took place during WW2. So when I decided I was going to make The Bridge, I instantly followed it up with “hell, why not make it into a WW2 movie”? I could have easily made this film as a contemporary piece but where would the fun be in that? I never do things because it’s easy; I do it because it’s hard. I love a challenge. I figured I could keep the same characters, themes, motifs, style, and wrap it around a WW2 setting. So I did.

Pre-production:
So it began. After a quick outline, I started writing the screenplay and, being a one-man crew at the time, I also started doing work on costumes and props. I lived and breathed WW2 24/7. I watched every WW2 movie and documentary I could get my hands on. I even got my hands some real WW2 letters to get a grasp on the era’s language. I felt like a student again and I loved it. I scoured eBay for every WW2 field gear I could afford to buy and the stuff I couldn’t get, I had them custom made cheaply in China. I wanted it to be detailed and authentic as possible while keeping my almost non-existing budget down. I remember coming home one day and having almost a couple dozen eBay packages on front door. It looked like the front door of the post office.

Casting:
The casting of The Bridge was actually one of the smoothest aspects of the entire process. I first went to my good friend Amy and asked her if she would like to help me produce the film. Having worked with each other before, I didn’t really have to ask twice. She was happy to be my first recruit.
For the leading role, I asked my good friend Pablo Soriano to take the part. Having worked with him before, we have a good understanding of each other. He is just a naturally gifted actor and he makes my job as a director so much easier. Plus, his puppy dog eyes make him a perfect protagonist.
For the leading female role, I went looking for a girl who had beautiful, almost hypnotic eyes. That’s when I spotted Leah in one my good friend’s music video. I called up Carlos and basically told him, “I need to have that girl for movie”. A few days later, she was on board.
I owe the discovery of Mike, the character who plays James Connolly, to my producer Amy. She had read the script and recommended him. I remember her telling me “Mike IS James”. Words that any director would love to hear and as usual, Amy was right. So a couple months later, the script was complete, the costumes and props were ready, and the cast was cast. We were ready to shoot!

Production:
With our extremely limited budget, I knew right from day one that we were going to shoot “The Bridge” on DSLRs, specifically the Canon 7D and 5D Mark II. With this in mind, I knew (as also the DP of the film), I was going to push these cameras to its limits. I wasn’t going to let my equipment limit my vision of the film. I knew at the very beginning that I may or may not have a crappy movie in the end but hell, it’s gonna look damn good! We all know about the camera’s limitations but I wasn’t going to bitch and moan about it, I was going to work around it. I took it as a personal challenge to make these cameras work and I did. About 75% of the film was shot with the 7D and the rest with the 5DM2. The main reason I shot with the 7D more was the 24p firmware update wasn’t available for the 5DM2 during the bulk of the shooting. I prefer the 5DM2’s full frame sensor the 7D cropped sensor. Production, like any other shoot, had its ups and downs. Ours was mainly San Francisco’s unpredictable weather. You can blink and the bay area can go from miserable foggy weather (which is what I wanted for the film) to perfect summer beach party weather.
Also, being a guerilla production also has its own set of problems. I remember an actor and I almost getting arrested at a national park because a tourist reported seeing “some soldier carrying a rifle”. We got patted down and escorted off the premises. Before the ranger let us go, she handed me a business card for film permits. I thought that was hilarious.

Post-production:
There wasn’t really a “post-production” for The Bridge. I did post simultaneously during production. I would shoot on a weekend and then do visual effects or picture and sound editing on the weekdays. It was a very indie film workflow. The upside was I always had very polished dailies to show my cast and that kept them motivated to give me their best.
I spent my first two years out of film school as a CG artist. Being able to do my own 3d animation, modeling, surfacing, lighting, and rendering definitely upped the production value of my film. CG artists aren’t cheap and I calculated that if I had paid someone else to do my visual effects, it would have been double the entire budget of the film.
I hate ADR and foleying but if you don’t have a budget, you have to do it yourself. We had two whole scenes where sound was completely unusable (the tunnel scenes) so we had to redo it from scratch. I remember ADR sessions inside automobiles and 2 A.M. foley when my neighborhood is quiet and I don’t have to deal with traffic and barking dogs.
I discovered my composer Justin browsing through some filmmaking forums. He is such a talented musician. He added so much emotion to my film. Being a super control-freak, it’s very difficult for me to hand off any aspect of my film to someone else unless I have 100 percent confidence in that person. Justin is one of those people. In fact, Justin was the only other person who had a hand in post aside from me.
It was tough being a “one man studio” for this film. I acted as DP and director on Sunday, editor on Monday, sound editor on Tuesday, visual effects artist on Wednesday and Thursday, and compositor on Friday. I got some rest on Saturday (while my two computer farm renders). But in the end, when it all comes together… nothing feels more rewarding than seeing the art you’ve created. I can safely say that I created something I’m very proud of.

Full Circle:
So here it is. 8 months work compressed into a 30-minute narrative short. The film I set out to create back in October of 2009. I would like to thank everyone who was a part of it. I couldn’t have done it without you. To my viewers, I hope this film challenges you like it challenged me. Enjoy.
Array // bridge  war 
CHANNELS // Drama 
Added: 1382 days ago by reservoirfilms
Runtime: 1800.00 | Views: 5153 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
Master Magician (1933) Directors: Colbert Clark, Albert Herman | Writers: Colbert Clark, Wyndham Gittens, Norman S. Hall, George Morgan, Barney A. Sarecky | Stars: Bela Lugosi, Viva Tattersall, Malcolm McGregor, George J. Lewis, Henry B. Walthall, Robert Warwick, Ethel Clayton, Roy D'Arcy, Karl Dane, Lloyd Whitlock, Bob Kortman, Lafe McKee | Synopsis: A mysterious criminal known as The Whispering Shadow commits crimes by means of a gang he controls by television and radio rays. Jack Norton, whose brother was murdered by The Whispering Shadow, suspects that the eerie Professor Strang - whose ghostly wax museum contains figures far too lifelike - may be involved in the crimes
CHANNELS // Action  Thriller  Classics 
Added: 2306 days ago by reservoirfilms
Runtime: 29.00 | Views: 27971 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
Synopsis: A mysterious criminal known as The Whispering Shadow commits crimes by means of a gang he controls by television and radio rays. Jack Norton, whose brother was murdered by The Whispering Shadow, suspects that the eerie Professor Strang - whose ghostly wax museum contains figures far too lifelike - may be involved in the crimes
Array // classics 
CHANNELS // Action  Thriller  Classics 
Added: 1925 days ago by reservoirfilms
Runtime: 1119.00 | Views: 5759 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated
Bodie is by far the best preserved ghost town in the United States.
Gold was discovered back in 1859 by William S Bodey and at its apex, the town had a population of 10,000 residents through the 1880's. Bodie was replete with the makings of old west folklore; gunfighters, saloons, miners, gambling halls and prostitutes, a rough place through and through. But the town's success didn't last and faded from 'glory' prior to World War I and was finally down for the count during WWII once all mining operations were halted due to the war effort. It was effectively abandoned with many of the structures retaining the inhabitants belongings because the roads out were toll and weight based; many people simply decided to leave their belongings behind to avoid large fees so the ghost town was born.
Today, after two fires, around 100 structures remain, (5% of the original town) some of which are filled with furniture, lined and matted with layer up on layer of rotting and sagging wallpaper. Some buildings are seemingly untouched time-capsules to the once treacherous lives of the miners and other inhabitants of the town. Kids toys sitting by the window, a ball peen hammer on the ground, strewn gears in a machine shop, and rusted hangers hanging in a closet. Walking the grounds, particularly the cemetery, I was overcome with a sense of foreboding and the gentle but incessant march of time continuing on. The once important lives buried under a wood tombstone were all but forgotten and those now nameless people who were loved or loved others, brothers, fathers, sisters and mothers, almost never existed unless you look at the uneven ground at a certain angle in the perfect light. We spent a week shooting with access to some of the interiors of the buildings, and the ability to shoot at night. Because it is located in the Sierra Neveda and its unique geography and high elevation, the weather was quite extreme and could change in a matter of minutes; most nights were very cold and the temperature often sat in the low teens and were mixed with snow, wind, and icey rain.
Bodie is kept in a state of "arrested decay" and hangs (sometimes literally) in a sort of desolated limbo, as the dry lumber, rusted nails, and worn masonry, slowly give into the sands of time.
Special Thanks to Ranger Tom Gunther. Thank you for your help!!!
Thanks to Matthews MSE, (Tyler, Bob, Ed) for helping me with some last minute requests and their use of the DC Slider and dolly track.
Array // town  ghosts  usa  bodie  broadcasting  reservoir  films 
CHANNELS // Clips 
Added: 1319 days ago by reservoirfilms
Runtime: 120.00 | Views: 22406 | Comments: 0
Not yet rated

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